Houthi strike forces have been seen carrying out armed exercises on Israeli-themed terrain, complete with Star of David tents, in the wake of British and US airstrikes in Yemen

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Houthi forces are pictured conducting exercises in terrain resembling Jewish homes following a number of US and coalition airstrikes over the past two days.

Photos shared by the Houthi Media Center late Saturday showed soldiers armed with Kalashnikov-style assault rifles operating in mock residential areas in Yemen.

Aerial footage from Jan. 11 also showed drone operators practicing while standing on American flags.

And during the exercises, missiles and tanks were tested near the northern border between Yemen and Saudi Arabia, in the Al-Baqaa area.

The photos were released after the Houthi leadership vowed revenge for attacks by allies in response to rebel attacks on merchant ships in recent weeks.

A joint exercise between Britain, the US and allies in the early hours of Friday morning was followed by subsequent attacks late on Friday and this afternoon.

Houthi soldiers take part in military exercises in mock residential areas on January 11, 2024

Houthi soldiers take part in military exercises in mock residential areas on January 11, 2024

The training areas can be seen from above and are decorated with the Star of David

The training areas can be seen from above and are decorated with the Star of David

The Houthis Media Center also shared images of militants flying drones flying American flags

The Houthis Media Center also shared images of militants flying drones flying American flags

The image appeared to show a tank fire during training exercises in Yemen on January 11

The image appeared to show a tank fire during training exercises in Yemen on January 11

The Houthis' ballistic missiles are Iranian-made and have a range of up to 2,000 kilometers

The Houthis’ ballistic missiles are Iranian-made and have a range of up to 2,000 kilometers

Britain and the US led the series of attacks on Houthi targets in Yemen early Friday morning in response to attacks on merchant ships in recent weeks that had led to a number of companies suspending operations in the area.

RAF Typhoons were photographed taking off from RAF Akrotiri, a British base in Cyprus, before images shared on social media reportedly showed explosions at targeted locations in Yemen’s interior. Five were reported killed in the attacks, and six were injured.

The Houthis called the attacks “barbaric” and said in a statement that “all US and British interests have become ‘legitimate targets’,” without elaborating.

“The Americans and the British should not believe that they will escape punishment from our heroic forces,” the Houthi Supreme Political Council said in a statement on their official media.

Later on Friday, Houthis launched an anti-ship ballistic missile at a merchant ship transiting the Gulf of Aden, south of Yemen. The missile missed its target by about 400 to 500 meters and the ship turned out to be neither British nor American owned.

The attack was followed late Friday by a second American attack. The Houthi movement’s Al-Masirah TV channel incorrectly reported in the early hours of Saturday morning that Britain was involved in the second round of strikes.

A new airstrike hit the Yemeni Red Sea port city of Hodeida today, after two nights of attacks on Iran-backed Houthi rebels.

A military source linked to the rebels told AFP that “the site where a Houthi missile was launched on the outskirts of Hodeida was hit,” adding that it was not clear whether the attack came from the sea or the air came.

The attacks have heightened concerns about the escalation of the conflict that has spread through the region since the Palestinian terror group Hamas and Israel waged war, with Iran’s allies also joining the fray from Lebanon, Syria and Iraq.

The Houthis, who say they stand in solidarity with Gaza, have carried out a growing number of rocket and drone attacks on what they see as Israeli-linked shipping on the Red Sea’s main international trade route.

‘We emphasized that to everyone [the Houthi] These operations are intended to support the Palestinian people in the Gaza Strip and that we cannot stand idly by in the face of aggression and siege,” Houthi chief negotiator and spokesman Mohammed Abdulsalam told Al Jazeera in December.

About 12 percent of global trade normally passes through the Bab el-Mandeb Strait, the entrance to the Red Sea between southwestern Yemen and Djibouti.

But since mid-November, rebel attacks have affected trade flows, while supply tensions are already putting upward pressure on global inflation.

THURSDAY: British and American forces launched attacks on Houthi military sites earlier this week

THURSDAY: British and American forces launched attacks on Houthi military sites earlier this week

THURSDAY: An unverified image appeared to show the outcome and British and American airstrikes in Yemen

THURSDAY: An unverified image appeared to show the outcome and British and American airstrikes in Yemen

Satellite photos show shelters in Hodeida, Yemen, in January 2023 (top) and yesterday (bottom) after the airstrikes

Satellite photos show shelters in Hodeida, Yemen, in January 2023 (top) and yesterday (bottom) after the airstrikes

The Houthi group emerged in the 1990s but gained international attention in 2014 during an uprising against Yemen’s government, leading to the ongoing civil war.

Yemen’s government subsequently resigned, sparking a humanitarian crisis crisis. Houthi forces continue to clash with a Saudi-led coalition and allies in the United States and some European powers.

The Houthis continue to receive millions in aid from Iran every year, which is the case offers help and training Hamas in Gaza and as much as $700 million a year Hezbollah in Lebanon.

The Houthis have been accused of several violations of international law – in addition to attacking non-combatant merchant ships in the Red Sea – including using child carriers. soldiersis expected to account for a third of all fighters in Yemen.

Human Rights Watch published a 2018 report detailing how Houthi soldiers would take hostages, arbitrarily detain people and use torture methods to extort money from family members.

The UN too reported in 2018, the Houthis diverted food aid from distribution areas intended for civilians affected by the humanitarian crisis.

And in 2019, Asharq Al-Awsat, owned by Saudi Arabia so-called that modern slavery had been reinstated by the Houthis in Yemen, based on “local reports.”

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